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NEWTON Notes Alchimiques - Ms 3975 (3ème partie et fin)


Notes alchimiques d'Isaac Newton 
(vers 1670)


189
it a more excellent sudorific, purging very well by urin
& sweat. Ibid p 140.
The bare pouder of pearls is a much richer
medicine then the magistery prepared by solution & precipitation
& crude harts horn, reduced onely to a gelly (as the greatest
part may be by fair water) then the magistery thereof
in making which the volatile spirits fly away. p 150.
 ‡ <in mg:>261e ‡ Gather in a convenient season & time of the day
Baulm or Celadine for instance, or some other fit hearb (for
all hearbs are not fit this way to be reduced
into liquors) beat it well to a soft mash in a marble
mortar, digest it 40 days in a dunghill or
Analogous heat in a bolt head hermeticaly sealed, &
it will be more liquid by much then before then take it out & separate the liquid from the
grosser parts (suppose by straining) & digest it again
in a gentle bath that the yet remaining grosser
parts may subside. Philter it, & add to it the fixed salt
of the afforesaid grosser parts dryed & calcined, &
more over add to it equall parts of the liquor of
good sea salt well purified & then melted &
suffered to run per deliqium. Seal it up in a
convenient glass, & expose it to the sunn for about six
weeks, at the end of which time there will swim
at the top of it the Primum Ens of the Plant in
a liquid form transparent & either green or red
or perhaps some other colour according to the
nature of the Plant. This primum ens of Baulm
taken early every morning so much in good
wine as will give it a tincture till the nailes hair
& teeth fall of & lastly the skin be dryed & exchanged for a
new one is said by Paracelsus to renue youth in
his book de renovatione et
restauratione where he describes this process excepting that
he mentions not the fixt salt of the Plant. This
Monsieur L. F. (Le Fever) told Mr. Boyle & that a
friend of his that had made it tryed it upon himself
for a fortnight till his nails came of without any pain. And upon an
woman of neer 70 yeares of age for 10 or 12
days till her Menstruae came copiously upon her so as to
fright her. And upon an old hen moistening her
food with some drops of it for a week, which about the
sixth day began to moult her feathers till she became stark naked & before
a fortnight began to regain others which when come
to their full growth appeared fairer & better
coloured then the first, & her crest was raised & she
laid more eggs then she was wont. The primum
ens of scrophularia may also be thus obteined,& though
the relator ascribed to this no such renovating power as
to that of Balm & Celadine, yet he found it
innobled with extraordinary virtues. Boyle Ibid p. 184.
The description of Helmonts Elixir
proprietatis see in his tractate intituled Sequuntur quaedam
imperfectiora, & Mr. Boyle Ibid p 193.
One cured a man of the scirrhus Lienis, & the
dropsy by the long use of sponges moistened with
lime water, & then squeesed & worn upon the spleen p 209
Strange cures are performed in the serpentine
Grotta neare Rome, where the patient being tyed stark
naked, hand & foot upon a straw bed, & by the
sulphureous vapor of the place & sometimes his own fear
is cast into a sweat & well lickt by a great
number of peculiar kind of serpents that inhabit
that Grotta. Ibid p 209
The Jasper stone is very powerfull to stanch blood
if tyed neare the place. p 214.
Oxen & calves are cured of the Sturdy by opening
the skull & taking out a little bladder of water. &
Gotes of the Dropsy by letting out the water at a slit
made under the sholder p 233.
If the codd of a sheep be tyed hard with a string it
rots & stinks within 2 or 3 days for want of nutriment.
A coach hors ready to drop down dead of the staggers
has been suddenly cured by rubbing his gumms with
the coach whip till they bled p 235.
Burnt feathers or the smoak of Tobacco blown upon
the face of a Hysterical woman, does often times almost
as suddenly recover her out of her fits of the mother as the
odor of perfumes did cast her thereinto. p 251.
cures of poysons. see p 263.

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A Helmontian cured himself & others of the pleurisy by Helmonts
Laudanum opiatum without bleeding p 272.
Cantharides are noxius to the kidneys & bladder, 263f to the
throte & glandulas there abouts, strammoneum to the brain,
Opium to the animall spirits & genus nervosum p 278
Salt & tartareous meats to the reins & bladder of those
troubled with the stone p 280.
The Lapis ossifragus, a stone so fixed as to sustein
the violence of reverberated fire, being for some days
together drunk in wine or aqua symphyti to the quantity
of about half a drachm or more, doth wonderfully
cement together the parts of broken & well set bones
whence in shops it is commonly called osteocolla, &
hath wonders related Of it both by Chemicall & Galenical
writers. p 284 It will doe perhaps in 5 or 6 days as
much as nature alone in 40 especially if applyed
outwardly also in the form of a pultis with onely
beaten Geranium & oyle of roses or olives. But
it must especially in young people be used
moderately least it produce a callus about the fracture
as hath done sometimes p 285
Tis strange that Phisitians have not tryed the power of
salivation by 263f in other then Venereal distempers, as in
ulcers of the Kidneys, Consumptions, Palseys etc, especially
since tis probable the tormenting & almost insupporting
symptomes accompanying salivation may be
mitagated. p 286.
The celebrated Practitioner Riverius besides his own
has published a collection of other mens receipts under the
title of Observationes communicatae. And the famous &
experienced Henricus ab Heer, hath among his
Observationes oppidò rarae, divers receipts that came even
from Mountebancks & Gipsies. p 294. The same 
Henricus ab Heer
 in the 8th chapter of his Spadacrene
reccons among the diseses which the Spaa waters cure,
Catarrhs, & the distempers which (according to him) spring from
thence, as the Palsy, trembling of the joynts, & others
a kin to these, Convulsions, Cephalalgiae, Hemicraniae,
Vertigo, redness of the eyes & face, the Erysipelita, Ructus

continui, vomitus, singultus, obstructions & even scyrrhus's,
if not inveterate, of the liver & spleen, & the diseases
springing thence, the yellow jaundice, Melancholia
flatulenta seu Hypocondriaca< Dropsies, gravel, Ulcers of
the Kidneys, & carunculae in meatu urinario;
Gonorhaeas & resembling affections, Elephantiasis or the
Leprousy, fluor albus mulierum, Cancers & Scyrrhus's
of the womb, fluxes, & even Dysenteries; the worms
(so as to voyd them even by urin) sterility, scabies in
the body & neck of the bladder clammy pituitous matter
collected therein, Ulcers in the Sphincter of it, yea
& by long use the stone it self is thereby diminished.
Afterwards he adds Paucissimos vel nullos Spadae
incolas Capitis doloribus, Cardialgia, Calculo,
Obstuctionibus renum, Hepatis, Lienis, Mesereicarum,
laborantes invenies: Ictericos, Hydropicos, Podagricos, Scabiosos
Epilepticos, quod sciam, nullos. (p 290.) Mensibus
movendis imprimis idoneae sunt hae aquae, — et tamen
nimium eorum fluxum facilius quovis alio
medicamento sistunt .
In Peru was an Indian that cured all diseases
by the juice of one plant alone wherewith he
annointed the limbs & any other part affected, & then
covering them warm provoked sweat, which sweat was
meare blood. This he wiped of with linnen cloths
& so proceeded till he thought they had sweat enough
in the mean time giving them the most nourishing diet.
This plant he would never by fair or foul means discover.
p 224.
A gentleman was cured of most obstinate Ulcers
& other consequent distempers, onely by being well
fumigated every morning with the smoke of a certain
pouder, which the gentleman thought was some
vegetable substance. p 253. perhaps the fumes of e30d
may doe much.
How balsamic a substance is diffused through pure e308
may be guessed at by the great change that is made
in the caustic salt of Tartar when it is so dulcified
as to make Helmont's excellent Balsamus Samech
which if one had the art of so preparing the salt &

193
liquor as to fit them for conjunction might be made
onely by frequently distilling pure e308 from very fine
salt of e33f. For by this means the Alcaly retaining
the sulphureous salt or balsamic parts of the e308 (as appeares
by the aquosity of the abstracted liquor, when it is
fully satiated so that the wine come of as strong as it was
poured on, will easily run per deliquium into a liquor not of
a caustic, but balsamic & something pleasant tast. p 388.

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Of volatile salts of Animal &
vegetable substances. see p 160
Helmont calls the salt & spirit of Urin, Nobile ad Icterum
aliosque morbos remedium & of the same crystalls of Urin
he saith, Quanquam ad veteres excrementorum oppilationes
(i.e. obstructiones) conferunt, nihil tamen adversus Lithiasin.
Boyles Philosophy p 319 part 2. Mr. Boyle seems rather
to prefer salt of hartshorn & Mans blood. p 320. And
adds that the diseases for which the spirit of Man's blood are
proper are divers but cheifly Astmah's, Epilepsies, acute
Feavors, Plurisies, & consumptions p 222. The volatile
spirit & salt of Eeles & Vipers is by many extolled against
obstructions & foulnes of the blood & a multitude of diseases
that spring from thence. p 328.
The spirit & salt of blood drawn without digestion
is little if at all inferior to that drawn by digestion
p 317. The preparations of these spirits see p 316 out
of soot, p 320 out of blood, p 339 out of harts horn, p 350
out of e339
The spirit & salt of harts horn differ little in dose or
vertue, they resist putrefaction, comfort nature, open
obstructions mortify acidities, volatise the blood, promote its
circulation, are effectuall in feavours, pleurisies, obstructions of the
Mesentery & spleen, & chiefly in coughs & distempers of
the brain & nervous parts. It has much releived the
Epilepsy, & madness especially if it spring from
feavourish distempers. It works chiefly by sweat & somewhat
by urin, without leaving behind it such a heat as other
sudorifics are wont. It must not be administered (
inwardly) when the primae viae & passages are too much obstructed
& stuffed with gros humors least by agitating the blood it
caus greater obstructions. The dose is from 5 drops or
grains to a drachm in wine, carduous benedictus water or
any convenient vehicle which is not acid. Hartman
commends it against worms of the stomach. Ibid p 345.
How to perfume & dulcify Urinous salts see p 373.
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209

Of Alcalies see p 162.
called Sulphur Antimonii auratum diaphoreticum, a triviall
toy as commonly used, but which may be thus exalted to a
most admirable virtue
Let the salts impregnated with the Sulphur be dissolved
untill they be red like blood, & separated from all
their terrene feces. Then by art reduce the whole mass
of salts with the e30d into a volatility, in which process
there will be a very unsavory stink, which will of its
own accord pass away, & you shall have of your red
lixivium a sweet mass without odour as white as snow
This snow is a Panacaea of 2641, purging
certainly without vomit or nauceousness, even in the weakest
bodies, & without griping, & is a cure for many (& those chronical) diseases.
But to proceed to a further exaltation of its
virtue, Take this snow, & according to the right art
of distillation, proceed with it, to wit mixing it with
Potters earth dried, & by degrees of fire distill it
untill all come over (which by cohobation is
obteined) leaving behind only a damned black insipid earth,
the spirit being tincted & fragrant, to colour
resembling a potable liquor of Gold, being of a
deep tincture, of which 5 or 6 drops will not fail
(even in the most deplorable cases) that may be
imagined.
Thus if Colcotar of Vitriol be perfectly washed
from its salt & dried & then boyled up with an
equall part of Salt of tartar liquefied, & then
both in a crucible melted & poured out, you
shall find the Colcotar will suffer all its e30d almost
to be imbibed in the lixivium. This then by
mortification & regeneration bring to volatility
& distill it (as was said of the e30d of 2641) & you
have a liquor of a yellowish green tincture &
fragrant.

In this liquor dissolve Argent vive & you shall find in
this dissolution the 263f imbraced by the e30d (conteined in the liquor)
& so fixed that in the fire both will give a reall metal
but being dulcified with spirit of wine without
reduction to a metal, become a true succedaneous medicine
to Helmonts horizontal Gold made by the Sulphur of
Vitriol of Venus brought into an oyle by the Alcahest & fixed.
The same way may be used in the e30ds of
2644 & 2643, yea in the Sulphur of the metallus
masculus.
These operations Paracelsus touches on saying Sunt
praeterea essentiae vini cineratae (i.e. Salts of Tartar)
quae aurum solvunt etc. si in circulum dentur  (i.e.
volatized till which time it cannot be circulated)
aurum reducunt. Nor is Helmont obscure as to this
particular where he saith, That if the spirit of
Volatile Salt of Tartar dissolve either Luna, 263f,
cornu cervi, crabbs eyes or any other simple it will
cure not only the fever but most (if not all) chronic
diseases.      Now 263f corroded by any liquor & not
fixed is an unsafe medicine. But this liquor dissolving
it gives it a fixation sufficient to make it a
noble medicine, but being united with a volatile
e30d (as I taught before, it then gives it a metalline
fixity after the same manner though in a
subordinate degree of nobleness with the fixation of it in
Helmonts horizontal gold, which is made & fixed by
the liquor Alcahest.
There are then 3 ways of operation upon
this volatized Alcaly in order to its application to
metalline bodies.
1 The Alcaly is volatised that is regenerated by
death & life & brought into a totally volatile salt
(which is of great virtue of it self.) This distilled
according to Art gives that noble liquor of which Helmont
Paracelsus give such noble encomiums that
wherever that spirit reacheth not no other will reach
This disolves all concretes only is coagulated upon
them (being dissolved into a volatile Salt, which

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being then sublimed from the dissolved Calx doth in imperfect
metalls rais their Sulphur, together with it self, & in perfect
metals it by oft circulation doth the like.
2dly then this Alcaly thus regenerated into a volatile
salt, if mixed with the Calx of either 2640 2643 or 2644
or the metallus masculus, or with the Regulus of 2641 & with
them distilled, it doth make them volatile & each time
the distilled spirit being put upon the Caput mortuum is
coagulated upon it.
Proceed by cohobation till your signe appear, which it
behoves each Philosopher diligently to attend. Coagulate
then your spirit in which is the metalline e30d hidden & with
spirit of wine dephlegmed extract the metalline
tincture from the salt, which when the extracting
spirit is drawn away remains fragrant & very
sweet & is of wonderfull virtue, little inferior to
any glorified e30d by any Alcahestical preparation
But 3dly (& that way I rather chose) let your
Alcaly be first of all melted with the calx of any
imperfect metal & then you have the e30d married
with the salt & by the fusion of fire somewhat opened.
This mixture proceed with after the way of volatising
salt of Tartar per se, & both being thus putrified
& regenerated together, do after their volatizing
more throughly unite together, which for that end
proceed with by cohobation so long untill they be
wholly volatised. Coagulate the spirit then into a
volatile salt & use it either with the salt united
or extract the e30d which is fragrant & sweet with
pure spirit of wine, & reccon your self then master
of a medicinal balsam which you can never enough
value. George Starky's Pyrotechny asserted from p 82 to p 86.
As for the supreme metals (Gold & Silver & their
compeer in homogeneity viz 263f) this volatized Alcaly
comes far short of the Alcahest, & yet its effects here
are such as may deserve the commendation of a noble
dissolvent

. For let 2609 & 263d be herin dissolved, the solvent by
acting on them in a dissolutive way, is it self coagulated into a
volatile salt: which when the flegm (ingendered by this
coagulation & the liquors spending its virtue in dissolving bodies)
is evaporated, will in a cool place crystallize.
This volatile salt sublime 3 or 4 times from the
calx of the dissolved Gold, & you shall find that besides the
virtues of 2609 with which it will be indowed, it will
carry up with it a volatile tincture of the 2609 leaving
the residue very pale.
Yea & by an art not difficult to an Artist expert
in Pyrotechny, the elements of the Gold will be dissolved
& made separable each from other even as in the
operation by the Alcahest, with this eminent difference
that this liquor by this dissolution doth each time loos
its activity being coagulated as oft as it is applyed to
action, & so rejecting a flegm is every operation
diminished in quantity, which the Alcahest doth not suffer.
So then as for the glorified sweet e30ds of 2609 & 263d
a man that can command these Alcalies volatile may
by their spirit attain them without the Alcahest in lieu
of which this spirit is far sooner & with much more
ease attainable, & he that knows the secret of
making it may make as much of it as he list.
But as concerning 263f that by this Art may be
prepared to most incredible uses as to medicine, if to
wit first the e30d of 2641 or of e316 of 2640, or of the metallus
masculus which is Augurellus his sulphur Glaure
(according to Helmont,) be volatised with the spirit of
Volatile salt of tartar & both made one liquor
together. In this liquor let argent vive be dissolved
& draw away the flegm till it be dry, put on more
of the spirit & resolve it so of untill it will coagulate
no more of the spirit but that it come of as strong as
it was put on. Thus is the Mercury in these
solutions imbraced by the spiritualised e30d so that each will


213
not leave other but upon as difficult terms as the 263f of
a metalline body would be separated from its e30d, & may
be reduced by an easy art into a metalline body, but
with greater discretion & no less ease & abundantly
greater benefit to poor sick creatures, it may be made
into a most noble medicine very sweet & of wonderfull
virtue. For the Salt of the coagulated spirit is left
together with the coagulate of the mercury & the spirit of e30d
& all thus joyned become a sweet precipitate in the dose
of 4 or 6 or 8 grains not oft repeated curing all
acute, & very many (if not most or all) chronicall
diseases.
But were no more to be attained by it but that
it makes the e30ds of 2641264026432644, or Zink, etc volatile
it were enough to make it valuable. For these
remedies work beyond what one unexperienced would
imagin: of which Helmont is witness. I exhort, saith he,
young Artists that by all means they learn to spoile
e30ds of their exotick & virulent qualities under
custody of which is hid the vital fire, composing the
Archeus to pleasant ease & quietness. For there are some
e30ds which being prepared & perfected, the whole Army
of diseases is conquered by them
 etc Which I more
confidently expect from & have found more
eminently performed in the e30d of Venus, of 2641 & especially
in the Sulfur Glaure of Augurellus; etc.
The preparation by that noble Author in that
place chiefly intended, is Alcahestical; to which this may
justly pass as a most noble & unparalleld succedaneum
The preparation also of the metallus masculus (i.e. Zink)
its Sulphur in defect of the great dissolvent may hence
be attained. For this volatile salt doth embrace & in
distillation bring over together with it's, self that e30d in
form of a high tincted metalline oyle, which then
coagulated on a fixt body, the metalline tincture may
be extracted with pure spirit of wine, the salt of the Spirit


of tartar being left behind (as being not dissolvable in
pure rectified e308) & is then reduced into that 263fall succus
or liquor by Paracelsus called Vinum vitae of which
Helmont gives so large a commendation. George Starkey's
Pyrotechny asserted & illustrated p 90, 91 & 92.
The virulency of some simples is to be corrected
& the defects of others taken away by bringing them
into a volatile saccarine essential salt (not saccarine
in tast but so called from its resemblance of sugar
Candy) which is done by the superinduction of a ferment
First then let the industrious Artist know that by means
of the fixt salt of any herb any volatile oyle may
be transmuted together with the Alcaly into a volatile
essential salt which is of a wonderful penetrative virtue.
which will penetrate without loss of its vertue through
all the digestions: whereas unprepared vegetables reach only to the first digestion. For they loos
their virtue by the ferment in the stomach & so after
they are resolved into Chyle by that first digestion,
are then rather ordinary nutriment then medicall.
Yea salt of Tartar alone would by imbibing the
acidity of the stomach soon degenerate into another
nature. But if they be first volatised by an
inseparable union with essentiall oyles till both become one
salt, they then pass through all the digestions Starkey's Pyrotechny p 96.
Let any vegetable (as Rhabarb<)> be taken subtilly pulverised &
searsed & mix it with an Alcali (e.g. salt of tartar)
ad of white wine or any other liquor as much as
will make it to the consistence of dow or pultis: So let
it stand that the salt may penetrate the pouders center
& as it dries moisten it again, or keep it in a
gallyglass prest or covered that it may not dry, & in six
weeks time at most the vomitive or purgative
quality will be wholly extinct yet without loss of
either the tast or colour or smell or perhaps any other specific qualities more then
if it had been moistened with fair water, nor quite
so much, for such an humectation would have

215
caused a fermentation which by the Alcaly is hindred. Starkey's
Pyrotechny asserted p 100
By Alcalies also may the gummous terrestreity of
concretes be separated. For instance, dissolve, Opium in clear
water or in spirit of wine (that makes no difference here)
decant it or filter it exquisitely that it be very cleer
& transparent then add to it an equal part of strong
lixivium of Tartar, & streight with a strong urinous scent
you shall see a separation of a large quantity of
a resinous curd, as it is in the mixing wine with warm
milk. Let it stand in a simpering heat till this
coagulum be got together, then filter it again & you
shall find a resinous or rather gummous substance, like
unto Aloes for colour & breaking, bitter & stupefying.
And so it is in all other concretes as wormwood, Rue,
Carduous etc. only let the solution & infusion be as
full of the simple as the moisture will dissolve. This
is to be found also in the ordinary elixation of malt
(with us called wort) & briefly in the decocted liquor of
all concretes; in them especially which are of an
eminent tast. Starkey's Pyrotechny asserted p 122.
Alcalies are volatised in two ways, by 
Alcoolization
 & by Elixation. Alcoolization is a feeding or
imbibing, or circulating a fixt Alcaly with a volatile
spirit till both be made one, a neutral production
arising between them distinct from each parent. And
of this head there three kinds of spirits used, Acetous
Urinous & vinous which give the Alcaly Alcoolizated
three distinct appellations: Arcanum Ponticitatis,
Arcanum microcosmi & Arcanum Samech.
Elixirization is performed by oyles essentiall & Tinctures
untill of both one Elixir or volatile salt be made.
of which are so many species as there are diversities of
essentiall & distilled oyles.
Of all these ways that which is done by an acetous
Alcool (as of Vitriol, of Salt, of Nitre, of e30d etc) is the
most facile. For the Alcaly is volatised by the ebullition
made at the pouring on the acid spirit; which an exepert distiller
shall find totally performed by reiterate cohobation which
may be rather called imbibition becaus the Alcaly drinks
up the spirit till it be satiated. Mix then the salt with burnt
clay (as in drawing spirit of e315 or e314) & draw of all the
spirit, then imbibe the caput mortuum & draw of the spirit
again & reiterate this till all the Alcaly come
over. So shall you have a nobes spirit Alcalizate which
may be called Acetum forte, Acetum radicis etc as
Paracelsus often calls it. But this spirit is acid, as
other spirits distilled with strong fire are, although it be very
penetrative & dissolving metals; & being by them turned
into a volatile coagulated salt it is of a most
admirable efficacy in medicine, yet that which is made by
elixirated oyles or vinous spirits is far more noble in
medicine. For between vegetables & those acid minerall
spirits there is a great remoteness, but Alcalies & Oyles
Essential & burning spirits are radically of kin to each
other, so that the Alcaly by them recovers what it lost
by burning that is a seminal vitall essential balsom &
so becomes not only volatile but fermental &
exceeding sociable to our nature. Starkey's Pyrotechny p 126, 127, 138
Happy is that Philosopher who shall make his
preparations so that a gentle heat shall make the
Alcalies fly, he (without jesting) may command
natures secrets. But if he must use a strong heat,
that will stamp a fiery impression on the spirits. p 141
Spirits of salt of tartar obteined by means of
pontique spirits will be acid & pontique, & those obteined
by means of essentiall oyles (which are vegetall e30ds)
& rectified spirits of wine which are but e30ds in a
disguise (witness the inflammableness of them) will not
be acid. Starkeys Pyrotechny p 141

217
The Elixiration of Alcalies with oyles is much of the
same nature with the making them into a Samech with spirits,
& the one way is convertible into the other by the artists
craft & industry. For essential oyles & burning Spirits are
but the same thing in a various disguise, & both hard to
be reconciled with fixed salts. Starkey p 142.
Concerning Essential oyles Helmont expresly saith, that
if they be joyned without any water, within 3 months
time (occulta & secreta circulatione) they will all be
turned into a volatil salt
. And of Spirit of wine he
saith that salt of Tartar by its bare touch doth turn
one half of it into water
 (robbing it of its volatile
saltness & fixing that upon it self with a kind of fixity.)
But in both there is something sufficiently obscure. For
in the Elixiration of oyles & Alcalies the pondus is not
set down nor the secret of the digestion. And in the
operation with e308 & salt of e33f the mystery of making
them touch (i.e. mix) is concealed. Here the vulgar chemists
are in a labyrinth becaus they know not the mean
of conjunction, which is not any superadditional
substance, to the matter but only modus dispositionis
of which if any be ignorant let him be ignorant.
Ibid.
Alcalies then with essentiall oyles are to be joyned that
both may make a Sapo together & then time by a
secret fermental decoction will transmute each into
a third neuter made of both, which is a volatile Elixir
So also Alcalies & pure spirits are to be joyned
together that one may seem to eat up the other, & then
this touch will be like the clutches of a thief, whose
hands are bands, els no mixture no union, &
consequently no operation on each other. e023. Ibid.
O foolish operators! that by your devised heats
would introduce ferments (the true parents of all
forms) & yet know not by any of your heats to imitate
the Sun in Bermuda in producing Oranges & Lemons. Pray
to God to direct you for here (to deal ingeniously) my
speech is very obscure.
Let Alcalies & oyles purely prepared embrace each
other in the bond of love, which will appear in a kind of
an urinous scent & a saponary mixture, which will be
white & thick like cream. Continue your decoction till
your mixture end in an union, & the oyle & salt be
both dissolvable without the least oyliness swimming
at top. This solution make with Spirit of wine; which will
mix (doubt it not,) the oyle & the salt being once
radically & inseparably united.
This solution in a due heat rectify & you shall
have a volatil burning spirit of the odour & tast
of the oyle & after it an insipid flegm & at bottom a
noble tincted balsamic Elixir
The volatile spirit deflegm exquisitely & then unite it
to the remaining balsom & digest them together till the
spirit be made one with the more fixed balsam; howbeit
rest assured that both are volatile
Which that you may advance yet more & more
in virtue, according to the quality of the essentiall
oyle, cause this balsam to dry & crystallise without
any extraneous addition of substance or separative
culinary heat. Then will this crystalline salt (like
an infant that is hungry) feed on, & in a short
time transmute into its own nature any essentiall
oyle, or if you pleas rather the same with which it was
at first produced.
Feed it then till it have eaten up at least
thrice as much of the essentiall oyle as was of the
Alcalisate salt: in which feeding let there be a
succession of humectation & exiccation of cold &
heat. The exiccation & cold the Air will give
(understood Philosophically,) the humectation & heat
the fire will give (understood not vulgarly:) which are
the main wheels by which nature circulates all,


219
yea the hardest things in the great world to a
transmutation. Understand this & neither the secret of the
Alcahest, nor the mysteries of the Sun & mercury will
be hidden from thee.
After these digestions untill the afforsaid proportion of
the oyle to the salt, give them fire & make them fly
which if they do not easily enough, imbibe them, & dry
them by a slow digestion (as before) with a convenient
liquor, as for instance good wine, or spirits, on which it
feeds & grows each circulation more & more volatile
& spirituall till at last it will sublime in a gentle
heat of sand in the form of a glorified salt, then
which the Kingdom of the Vegetables hath not a more
noble medicine. Starkey's Pyrotechny asserted p 143, 144, 145, 146.
For the making of Samech let pure spirit of wine
& pure salt of Tartar (without mixture of any thing
save only the addition of true spirituall love which is the
aethereal fire, the secret fire & the true & only exciter of
the ferment) be joyned, & so digested, & in few days
most part of the spirit will be retained in the salt.
Separate the flegm carefully & discreetly, & renew your
spirit as much as it lost. (You may put on each time of
the spirit four times the weight of the salt) thus in 4
or 5 reiterations (or six if you pleas) you shall have
a balsom tincted like a pure Ruby, of a gratefull
tast & smell which is a noble medicament called by
Helmont the Balsamus or arcanum Samech.
Proceed to the highest exaltation of it thus. Let
this Balsom without any extraneous addition to its
substance be dryed & without any vaporous heat of
Vulcan. Then will it like a living child thirst for its
own food, which give it by severall & temperate
imbibitions till this wheel hath been 7 times turned
about upon it. Then make it fly in a moderate heat
of sand & it will be a noble balsamic essential
salt which is as to medicinall use Alcalium apex, &

& may worthily be reputed medici corona.
This operation you see hath great affinity with the
foretaught way of Elixiration by essential oyles. For the
conjoyning of both these ways together I need say no more
having above taught to dissolve the united oyle & salt
with pure spirit of wine & to distill it with it, & after
its exiccation to feed it with the like spirit 5 6 or 7
times or oftener as you please.
But besides as to all aromaticall simples, (as Anise, Fennel, Cummin, Coriander, Clove
Mace Nutmeggs Cinnamon etc) who sees not that their
Crasis lies in a light spirituall oyle, which by
distillation with pure spirit of wine is extracted & becomes so one
with the spirit that it seems in tast & smel no whit inferior
to the simple Aroma from whence it was drawn. This
spirit circulate with pure salt of Tartar after the manner
of Samech's process, & you have a Samech &
Aromatic Elixir, either of Cinnamon (which is noble for the
cure of the Palsie, Epilepsy, Convulsions, Vertigo etc) or
of any other as the use shall dictate. And this is
a notable secret.
For a minerall advancement of these
preparations, there may be taken a sulphur extracted out of 2641
the metallus masculus (which I tell thee is Zink) & so
out of Lead & Tin. But there is a naturall e30d known
by the name of e30d vive & was to Hippocrates his
theion pur, a noble pure e30d wholly inflammable
without any faeces, & consequently hath little danger
of an adulterate mixture which is common (& that
Arsenicall the most malignant) in the ordinary (
vulgarly sold) brimstone:     Take then any extracted e30d
or this e30d vive which is a most noble subject fraught
with incomparably excellent rarities: Cohobate it

221
with oyle of Terebinth in an indifferent quick fire of sand
till the oyle hath wholly brought over the e30d in form of a
tincted oyle yet faetid. The water that separates itself
in this distillation (which will be some though not much)
throw away, With this oyle proceed to Elixiration as
with any other distilled oyle. When the union is compleat
Elixate it with pure spirit of wine distilled from Cardamon
seeds or cloves or Cinnamon & distill of the spirit & flegm till the tincted balsom
remain very red. Rectify the spirit & reunite it to its balsom
Digest it in a secret digestion till it be dry. Thus is all
the faetor taken away & the Elixir smells fragrantly, which
feed with fresh aromatic spirit six or seven times. Then
make it fly & you shall have a glorious tincted
balsamic essential volatile salt which may be called
Elixiratum Samech sublimatum Sulphuris Vivi or
Antimoniale etc. This medicine is universal &
wonderfully restorative, curing all diseases powerfully in
tono unisono. A little inferior, but a noble
succedaneum to the grand Alcahesticall arcana.
This operation is very tedious to bring to this height
but being so advanced it is a middle way to prepare
the essentia membrorum & vinum Vitae of Paracelsus
which (out of metallus masculus especially or out of
2641) besides its incredible cures by it performable,
it restores the body of man wonderfully renewing
the hair teeth & skin.
He commends oyle of Therebinth for this elixir
exceedingly & adds Let the Alcaly be elixirated with twice
or thrice as much of this oyle (impregnated with e30d) till
both salt & oyle will dissolve inseparably in e308, which
e308 let be inriched with distilling it from Cinnamon &
with it dissolve your Elixir. Distill the volatile spirit
from the balsamic rubie-coloured Samech, dephlegm
both & reunite them.     Then have ready some

noble vegetal tincture as Myrrhe, Aloes & Saffron, &
of them make an Elixir proprietatis Samech thus.
These species beaten up & mixed with a equal part of
pure salt of tartar, are by an artificiall digestion
so macerated that they will yeild their full tincture prepared
corrected & advanced. This tincture then extracted with
pure e308 inriched by reiterate distillation with spirit of
Cinnamon, add to the former elixerated Samech; & the
spirit abstracted (which will be wonderfully fragrant) & both
the balsamic Elixir & spirit purely dephlegmed, &
reconjoyned & by a secret digestion made all one
inseparably, (that is the Samech & the fragrant spirit &
the tincture) will then be a balsamick
Samech Elixiris proprietatis very fragrant which I
am confident comes not short of if it exceed not
the way of the Alcahestical preparation.
Although Helmont knew the samech well yet this
way of applying it to Vegetables I beleive he knew not.
These preparations of Salt of e33f with oyles & spirits are brought to perfection with a far inferior
degree of heat then would be requisite for making the
volatile spirit of salt of e33f for mineral operations.
If you bring this Elixerated Samech to a
spontaneous granulation & so by degrees to a totall
exiccation & feed it with the Aromatical spirits 6 or 8 times
each time drying it by the Air & moistening it by the fire
& ferment of nature, & then by a modest fire of sand
sublime it (although the sublimation may be spared for tis
enough that it be sublimable) you will have a most
glorified tincture, which you may take in a dose of 10
15 or 20 grains.
This process of the elixir proprietatis take as
a rule for preparing any tincture whether of
Hellebore black or white, with which use spirit aromatised with Cardamon & Coriander

223
seeds, or Colocynthida with which use what aromatic spirit
you please. But for the commixture of species take my
composition. Hellebore is eminently splenetical &
cephalical with it prepare Assarum roots & Zalap. Sometimes
it & Opium, which I call Elixir Ladani Cephalicum &
spleneticum. For an Hepatic, Enula Campane
roots with Rhabarb & Hors-radish: For a Stomachick
Saffron Rosemary flowers & Snake roote. For an
eminent diaphoretick, snake root saffron & Opium.
For an eminent diaphoretick, Satyrion (out of which
is Paracelsus & Helmonts Aroph, which take in a
Parenthesis) Rhabarb & Saffron. Against a costive
temper, Colocynthis Aloe & Balsome of Perue:
Against a Cough & flux Opium Carenna &
Gummi Gutta. And so you may vary as reason
shall direct you, preparing all after the manner
of the foretaught Elixit proprietatis.
As for the Alcoolization of Alcalies with spirit
of urin & its mixture with a vinous spirit I shall
teach it in that part of my Pyrotechny triumphing which treats of
the Microcosm. For in that piece I shall discover
these ten mysteries. 1 the mystery of the Microcosm
2 of Alcalies. 3 of Sulphurs; 4 of 2641; 5 of 263f;
6 of 2640; 7 of 2644 & 2643; 8 of 2642; 9 of metallus
masculus: & 10 of 2609 & 263dStarkey's Pyrotechny asserted.


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225
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226
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227

Gross Ingedients
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228
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229

First preparation
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230
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231

3 principles
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232
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233

4 Elements
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234
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235

Mercuries
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236
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237

Sulphurs
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238
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239

Salts
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240
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241

Fires
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242
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243

Of the work with common 2609
The Gold must be purged with 2641, the Mercury first
internally by adding a true Sulphur gradually
according to the number of Eagles, then externally by
subliming it from salt & the scoria of 2642 & boyling it in
Vinegre & salarmoniack. (Secr. Rev. cap 15) Then with
two parts of this mercury amalgam one part of
Gold ( ibid cap 16) that is if the mercury be of 7
Eagles: Or 3 parts of 263f with one of 2609 if of 9 or
10 Eagles. For then the 263f being impregnated with more
internal e30d cannot beare so much external (
Comment. on Ripley's Gates p 142, 143, 146, 296     ) If there
be 7 Eagles the spiritual e30d in the 263f is one third part
of it (ibid p 144.) It may be done with 263f of 4 Eagls
well cleansed & then the proportion is 3 of 263f to 2 of
the body (ibid p 148, 296). The general rule is that the
amalgam while it is working be very pliable &
yet let no 263f sink to the bottom (ibid p 150) After you
have done working it if stand still a while it grows
hard & brittle, yet is fusible in heat like lead (ibid
p                          ) The easiest & safest
proportion for a Tyro is of seven Eagls (Comment. Ripley p
149      ) If the water be acuated by more then
10 Eagles, it will be impregnated with too much volatil
2609 so that it will not amalgam but grow hard
speedily (                    ) It is like that 263f
which is commonly sold, in form flux & colour
only something more ponderous & brighter (Commentary,
Ripley p 161. Secr. Rev. p 12. 16.    ) Tis made of Common 263f
& the compound body by the mediation of a ferment
(Exposition Ripley's Epistle p 12, 17, 18, 20, 21, 26, 33.
Comment. Gates p 307. Secr. Rev. p 12. 16. 29) The 263f being frequently
cohobated upon that body till it become a fiery
water. (Eposit. Ripley Ep. p 20   ) whereby not the pondus
but the celestial virtue is extracted out of the
compound (ibid p 12 21) Out of which though it be a body
proceeds yet a specificated odour by the ferment
which intercedes it & the 263f. Yea & oft the pondus of
it is diminished (if the compound be much washed)
after it is sufficiently clean. (ibid p. 18.) so that it receives
its celestial vertue & power, not so much from

the compound body as from the ferment (ibid p 21) yet
it is hereby impregnated with volatile Gold which comes
out of the reins of Mars (ibid p. 33) This ferment
is done by the mediation of Diana's Doves
applied by the art of the nymph Venus. Exposition on
Preface Ripley's p. 7. 58 Commentary on Gates p 266. 307. Secrets Reveal'd
p 6, 13, 16, 29, 52, 54. ) Cath pag. 12. & the cohobations are the Eagles
Commentary on Gates p 58, 238, 239. Secrets Reveal'd p 31.
In respect of which 263f is called the internuncio ibid p 266.
And Trevisan saith sunt quaedam mercurii
sublimationes a propriis corporibus a quibus saepe
relevatus & reconjunctus rejicit faeces — et postea
fit potens in dissolvendis speciebus. — Sublimatur autem
per simplex sal. etc.  The feces must
be washed away between every Eagle with great
diligence till the 263f be bright. If you be slack
7 Eagles may not add the vertue of two or three
Commentary Gates p 258
Afterward it must be distilled sometimes per se. ibid
p. 239. Secrets Reveal'd p 55. 56. The doves are applied
igne aperto Snyders Pharm. Cath. p. 11, 12, 19 31. 38, 69. 70
               & then the body at a certain sign
appearing is to be quenched in 263f.
Otherwise the tender soul flies away & leaves the
body moveles & dead in the form of an Electrum
relapsed into a Hydrophoby. Secrets Reveal'd p. 16. Snyders
Pham. Cath. p 10 11. 12. 19. vide et (see also) p 69.          After this
the 263f will be dried up & calcined by digestion
                               & then is to be elevated
& purged.                      & the doves to be fresh
applied every time Secrets Reveal'd p. 17.
These doves are first to be enfolded in the arms of 2640
Secrets Reveal'd p 54. Snyders calls these sulphur &
niter & says they are first to be united & then
by their fiery spirit metal is to be burnt, & this he makes
the key. p 65, 71. And calls this the Sympathetick fire
hot cold mois & dry, & siccus liquorculus ex
contrariis compositus ignibus. Pharm. Cath. p 11. Tis ignis
contra naturam, Artephius his ignis lampadis. Ripleys
first menstrue of which he says We calcine perfect
bodies with it & nothing unclean enters but the green
Lyon. These doves profit not unles they be dead
at the first receiving, & then in the sublimation
they stay in the bottom with the metal Secrets Reveal'd p 17
The 263f thus prepared & gold must be digested in the spirit
called Venus Secrets Reveal'd p 77, 79

245

Of the work with artificial 2609
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246
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247

Times
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248
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249

Proportions
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250
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251

Hieroglyphicks
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252
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253

Progress of the Decoction
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254
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255

Use of the stone
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256
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257

Miscellanies
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258
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259
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260
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261

Of the work with common Sol. vide pag 244.
Virgin mercury (Marrow of Alchemy part 2. p. 25.
Medea's broth Marrow of Alchemy part 2 p 23, 47
reviving Spirit Marrow of Alchemy part 2 p 23, 47
Water. Marrow of Alchemy part 2 p 23. 24. 25
Vegetable menstruall
Green Lyon. Ripley p 125
e023 Lead. Commentary on Ripley's Gates p. 31. 45
The three are 2609 263d & 263f
Body soul & spirit. Marrow of Alchemy part 2 p 23.
Sulphur 263f & salt.
262
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263
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264
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265

Spiritus dulcis Vitrioli
211e oleum e317li Ex vitriolo Dantiscano 1 pondo
spirtum Vini optime rectifcatum 2 pondo. Digere
per septimanam et amplius. Vitrum nonnunquam
commove sed leniter ne fermentatione
excitata vitrum frangatur. In Retorta satis ampla,
igne leni distilletur ad siccitatem. Ultimò
ascendent vapores albi & postquam igne satis
intenso liquor omnis destillatus fuerit manebit
in fundo terra caustica, pondere unciae
unius hac libra materiae. Quo diutius materia
digeritur eò felicius experimentum succedit.
Spiritus qui ultimò ascendunt nobiliores sunt.
Si oleum aliquod in spiritu destillato supernatet separandum
est. Si oleum e316li et spiritus vini aequalia
sunt, major erit quantitas olei
supernatantis ut et majus caput mortuum.

Dosis spiritus hujus dulcis est a 15 ad 30
guttas in vehiculo commodo, quale est vinum
albo, vel Rhenano aut aqua melissae, aut aqua menthae
vel majorano. Si sudor provocandus est
convenit aquarum aromaticarum aliquam
pro vehiculo adhibere; si urina, vinum
Rhenanum Eligendum erit. Sudorem et
urinam provocat nec lassitudinem inducit ut
facit Therica. Utile est in Febribus, in
Hydropicis, Epilepticis, tussi


In febribus malignis et peste misce
hunc spiritum cum
serpentaria Virginiana et contra-earva
Hispanica ana crassè pulverisata,
ut spiritus ad altitudinem duorum vel
trium digitorum supernatet. Digere per
duos vel tres dies. Effunde spiritum per
inclinationem. Dosis, ut supra, sudorem
iam magis provocabit.


211e calamum aromaticum, cinamorum,
galangam et corticum citrium ana.
Menstruo predicto tincturam extrahe et
erit optimum stomachicum: eo quod
Minschict (pag     ) descripsit nobilius.

Cum spiritu Baccharum Sambuchi extrahe
tincturam ex Opio 0292ii Croco 0292i Cochinelia
02921 Contra-earva Hispanica 02921 Serpentaria
Virgineana 02921. Est Elixir anodinum quo
Somnum et sudor simul inducuntur.
Dosis a 20 ad 30 guttas. Si eadem
tinctura extrahatur cum spiritu salis
armoniacai, dosis eadem eundem producit effectum
in Febrilitantibus postquam morbus ad ἀκμὴν
venit et incipit mitescere.



1
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211e Vitriolum Dantiscanum ad albedinem calcinatum in vitro inferius
See manuscript. plano & hermeticè sigillato digere in
arena in calore secundi gradus arenae
paulatim aucta ad dies 40 et
calcinabitur in pulverem rubrum et mire
sudorificum, cujus grana 10 vel 12 dosis est.
Si non bene calcinando figatur vomitum
ciebit.

Cinnaberis Antimonii (si sulphur nigrum
quod paulò volatilius est, calore lento
separetur) fit coloris ruberrimi & in
Hypocondriacis, Hystericis, tabe et chronicis
universis miros edit effectus. Sanguinem purgat
et dulciorem reddit. Dosis est 21081 vel
In Hystericis misceatur cum gumma
galbani & in pillulas formetur. Sulphur
nigrum et faeculentum nocet ideoque
separari debet. Separatur autem in
cucurbita lata et brevi.

211e Chalybis lib: 1, e339 Veterum 21251, Tartarum
21255. Curcumae 21251/4.

e339 veterum 02921/2 tritum et solutum in Vino
albo, ad partum mulierum conducit & dolores
lapidis tollit.

Colcotar & aqua destillata albuminis ovorum
vel cremor lactis. Fiat cataplasma et mane et vesperi
applicetur, Cancrum in pectoribus mulierum nondum ruptum certissime sanat


Si cancer ruptus est, accipe fuliginem
ligni, calcina, extrahe Salem fixum,
funde in cochlari ferreo. Fiat pulvis
& spargatur in vulnus. Coeundo cum
liquoribus acidis fumum excitat. Spargatur
donec fumus cessat. Arescat & indurabitur
pre se spatio septimanae unius dein
spatio septimanae alterius aut paulo
amplius decidet per se, & pectus sanatum
derelinquet.

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267

Vide pag 158
Running 263f carries not up our e316 nor stays with it unless 2641 be
first sublimed from the e316, & then 263f carries the
e316 which remains in the caput mortuum.
Running 263f carries not up Lead ore impregnated
with spirit of
either 2640 or 2641, in sublimation
either before nor after 2641 is sublimed from
it.
Artificial depurated 2641 poudered & mixed with Fullers
earth one part to two or 3 & sublimed in a
retort of white glass the retort melted & sunk
down without making the 2641 rise, excepting that
when the 2641 was red hot some fumes rose &
stuck to the top of the glass: but not in long
barrs as when the 2641 without being melted
was sublimed.
There is a liquor as insipid as water of
which a man may drink a pint without the
least offence or injury. Tis got & prepared in

268
three days & may be made at any time of
the year, but best in September or the
end of August the air being then well
impregnated & perhaps for the same reason
in spring about April or may. For tis a
general Menstrue more generall then
that of spirit of salt or spirit of wine. This
Menstrue digested with the calx of 2609 or
263d for 30 days in a due heat
extracts their tinctures & leaves the
rest of the body like white ashes not any
more reducible by fusion to a metal nor
perhaps fusible. It extracts 12grains of e30d out of
an ounce of 2609 & 10grains of e30d out of an
ounce of 263d & leaves the rest of the body in
a white calx as above. It extracts also the
tinctures of other metals. Tis prepared
with an easy heat without trouble or labour & all the art & difficulty
is in the degrees of heat & modus of working
Distilled spirit of 2641 poured upon the white
calx of sublimed & precipitated regulus of 2641 did
not in digestion coagulate upon it but
after it had been for sometime digested
with it, evaporated almost all away in
an acid spirit so that there remained
with 10grains of the calx scarce one grain of
the spirit, & this grain dissolved in water
& bein wast away & the calx edulcoriated
& dried there remained but 10grains of the

269
calx as at the beginning.
A sort of 2641 which had large & long white veins
running all one way without colours (blew &
yellow) intermixed & brake easily according
to those veins into long splinters but
would not easily break cross those veins,
was poor in Regulus. Eight ounces thereof
melted with 4 ounces of 2643 or 2640 & 5 1/3 of e009 gave at
the first fusion but about 2 ounces of Regulus
or scarce so much, & 8 ounces of the same
2641 melted with 8 ounces of e315 gave but
4grains of Regulus.
Another sort of 2641 which came from
the straits & looked like the foot of good 2641 having all over the loaf little & very short veins
running every way across bedded in a
matter of the same colour which brake
almost like steel without veins but coarser & in some
postures looked yellowish in others blewish in certain
places & was made into very large loafes,
of above a foot in length &
breath & brake every way alike. Of this
4grains e315 4grains, 5 1/3 grains, 6 2/3
grains beaten & mixed together gave 15grains
93grains, 3grains of Regulus . Whence 2641e315
:: 12. 15 1/2 or 7 to 9 is the best proportion
to get most Regulus in proportion to the summ
of the matters. The mixture was put by
little & little into a red hot crucible in a quick fire &
when all in was stirred a little with a
tobacco pipe & being covered with a live
charcoal
270

& let stand a little while it presently
was covered over with a hard scoria. After
which it was taken of the fire & let cool. Of
the same 2641 4 ounces first
melted alone, e315 4 ounces mixed with charcoal
poudered 1/8 of an ounce & put in
afterwards by degrees gave no Regulus. Item the
same 2641 4 ounces e315 4 ounces good white
Tartar 2 ounces mixed together & put into
a red hot crucible by degrees gave 40grains
of Regulus. & the matter in fusion was thick
like bird lime & did not crust in the
surface as it did when niter alone was
used but swelled like leavened past.. Item the same 2641 4 ounces e315
2 ounces, Tartar 2 1/2 gave about 28grains
of Regulus. & the matter in fusion was
sufficiently fluid. If Tarter be used
I conceive 2641e315e33f :: 3. 2. 2 or 2641e315 + e33f :: 3. 4 may be
a good proportion. But niter alone seems
to give most Regulus. If tartar be used
the matter must be kept longer
on the fire that the e33f may be well
calcined. e023 Regulus 2641 must not be refined but only melted per se
If you refine it the salt comes of as fume as it was cast on, &
wasts the 2641
A third sort of of 2641 bought of Mr. Box in small loafs with
small hair veins running all one way &
a little foot & many colours up &
down the veins & foot. Of this 2125iii, Indian
Peter 2125ii, Good white Tartar 2125ii (the Peter
& Tartar being the same as above)
being beaten fine & mixed together &

271
thrown by little & little into a well heated
crucible & the crucible covered with a live charcoal,
the matters soon flowed & became very fluid
& liquid like molten metal, & boiled a little
continually by the avolation of the spirits of the
e33f & e315. After it had stood on the fire about
half a quarter of an hour or not much
longer being poured off it gave
1/4 + 1/16 + 1/73 parts of an ounce of Regulus that
is 1/3 of an ounce or 1/9 of the 2641 besides
that a little Regulus stuck in grains to the top
of the pot & some of the matter fell
besides the crucible. So that the Regulus may be
recconed 1/8 of the 2641 at least. This 2641
was therefore better then either of the two
former sorts.
The specific gravity of water was to
that of the 3d sort as 100 to 427 to
that of the 1st sort as 100 to 396 to that
of the 2d as 100 to 427.

Regulus 2643 2, Copper 4 melted together &
poudered & ground fine & imbibed with e32d twice,
drank up the liquor slowly & with difficulty in
the heat of blood, tasting acid till it was
dry. But when dry it continued dry
without per deliquium & was increased from 120grains
to 176grains. Out of this matter ground was
extracted with water about 75grains of blew
vitriol such as is extracted out of copper
alone.
Regulus 2640 2, 2640 4, spelter Tinglass 1, melted together
gave a substance sufficiently brittle, even as brittle
as the former. It brake
272
smooth like glass all over the lower half
In the upper half were
many glittering granulae of Regulus of 2641 & between them it
brake rough like fine steel. This being
melted again & stirred well brake rough
with granulae of Regulus of 2641 all over it. It
seems the copper by mixing with
the speltar lets go some of the Regulus
& the glassiness was now lost by the avolation
of some of the Spelter. In other trials with the
same proportion of materials the mixture
became glassy all over & without granulae
of Regulus. If at the first fusion there were 2 of Regulus 2640
3 of 2640 & 1 of spelter, the matter was
more brittle & brake all over like fine steel
except a very small line at the edges where
it brake smooth like glass, In the middle above was a drop of Regulus of 2641. This melted again
with 1/16 more of copper so as to make the
proportion of Regulus, 2641, spelter as 10, 16,
5, became more glassy, & the Regulus 2641 became
dispersed all over the metal in little granulae.
If at the first fusion there were Regulus 2640 2,
2640 6, Spelter 1, the mixture brake all over
like steel without any drops or granulae
of Regulus. & was very hard & difficultly
pulverisable. The best proportion seemed
2, 4, 1. This pulverised imbibed e32d very
freely & the extracted salt conteined 1 part
of metal & 3 of e32d. Let the salt be dried
upon it three or four times & these extract
En tridentem!
273
Regulus 2644 2125iiii, e32a 2125iiii, 2641 vi gave Regulus 2125iii which was
so clean that saltpeter thrown upon it in fusion came off
white. This regulus ground fine I used in the following Experiments.
vizt.
The said poudered Regulus 100grains imbibed with e32d dried
very slowly suppose in 12 or 15 hours & then
weighed 120grains. Of this 60grains sublimed in a Retort with
vulgar e339 100grains scarce melted in the sublimation
& left below 17grains in form of a black spongy
matter not melted together, & the sublimate
precipitated into a red pouder weighing 38grains which
flowed & bubled in a moist form upon a red hot
iron & fumed away. The said remainder or
caput mortuum 6grains sublimed with e339 12grains left
1 3/4grains below.
The said Regulus of 2644 6 (not yet poudered)
melted with 2646 1 part & poudered. Of this 100grains
imbibed with salt of 2641, dried quickly suppose in
3 or 4 hours (that is in a quarter of the time
that it dried in the former experiment & was
perfectly dry while that continued very moist. For I
dried them both together in the same heat, & in
like glasses. And this when dried weighed
120grains. Of this 60grains sublimed in a retort
with vulgar e339 100grains left 4grains below melted
together in the form of amber or white
transparent gum; excepting that a grain or two
thereof was melted into a round lump of
metal which brake like Regulus. The sublimate
precipitated into a light coloured pouder
inclining to red but much paler then the
274
former. This pouder weighed 47grains & upon
a red hot iron melted bubled & fumed
away more freely then the former.
Regulus 2644 10 parts, Regulus 2644 12 + 2646 1 = 10 parts,
Regulus 2644 4 + 2646 1 = 10 parts. Each imbibed
with e32d drunk up 2 parts thereof. The first
was 12 or 15 hours in drying, the 2d & 3d
dried in an hour or two & the 2d dried
more quickly then the 3d. Each of these
10grains sublimed in the open air with vulgar
e339 12grains the 1st & 3d left 2grains below
the 2d 2 1/2grains. And the 1st in sublimation
boiled more then the 2d & the 2d more
then the 3d. For the first boiled much
the 3d scarce at all.
Item the 2d imbibed 60grains, & the 3d imbibed
60grains as above. Each of these 60grains
ground with e339 vulgar 80grains & sublimed
in retorts: the 2d in sublimation melted
more freely then the 3d & part of the
sublimate thereof ran down again in
transparent drops which that of the
3d did not. After sublimation there
remained below 8grains of the 2d like a
sooty matter not melted into drops &
4grains of the 3d melted into drops: so
that 20grains of e339 carried up 13grains of the
2d & 14grains of the 3d. And therefore
the third is more volatile then the 2d.
The sublimate of the second precipitated

275
sank more readily to the bottom of the water
& looked much redder then that of the 3d.
For that of the 3d looked pale like ashes &
when stirred continued longer in the water
without subsiding & made a more spongy
& light mudd when it did subside: so that
it was subtiler then the precipitate of the
3d. The sublimate precipitate of the 2d when dry
weighed 45 1/2grains besides about 1/4 or 1/2 of
a grain which was lost: that of the 3d
weighed 47 1/8grains. Perhaps 20 grains of e339 would
carry up more then 14 grains of the 3d. So
that in the 2d there sticks about 1/3 of
the e32d in the 3d none at all or but 1/10.
The 2d & 3d laid upon a red hot iron
melted & fumed in some measure away
But if the iron had just lost its red
heat before they were laid on it, they
fumed without melting.

e327 dissolved in more & more water lets fall
more & more precipitate as the solution of 2641 doth.
In a little water it let fall 166grains of precipitate
& by addition of much more water it let fall
33grains more, in all 199 or 200grains & the
remaining salt when dried weighed 415grains. So that the
first faeces, the 2d faeces, the whole faeces & the
salt were as 5, 1, 6, 12 1/2.
Double e00d & e339 in any proportion to
one another dissolve half their weight of 2641
or 15 dissolves 8. Put in the liquor till the e339 be
dissolved, then put in the 2641 by degrees & let it
276
stand 2 or 3 hours in the heat of boiling water
Then put in a little more 2641 & if
it work on that let it stand longer. e339 is totally dissolved in 4
times its weight of liquor: but e012 after the
2641 is precipitated is totally dissolved in thrice
its weight of liquor. e00d dissolves the whole
2641, coagulates with the reguline
part & increses its weight. If e307 made of e327 dissolve
2641 & the e307 be added by degrees all the e326
precipitates upon the 2641 & coagulates with it
If in the same e307 the white calx or fex of
2641 which remains after the 2641 is dissolved
in e00d be put in by degrees: the liquor
takes up much of this fex & extracts
a fluid distillable e32d & the fex drinks
up much of the e326 & coagulates it
so that you cannot separate them
by philtring; & if the e316 which together
with the fluid e314 of 2641 is separated by philtring
be distilled the e314 of 2641 distills over in a fluid
form & leaves all the e316 coagulated in a
white colour & form like the caput mortuum
of e00d which being afterwards urged in a great
heat so as to be almost red hot would not
ascend into the neck of the retort. Nor did it
upon a red hot iron emit any fume. So then
the white calx of 2641 made dissolving 2641 in e00d
is not to be used for extracting our 2640.
e00d 240grainse339 120grains 2641 180grains gave a
white salt 45grains which in Air grew a little
moist but did not run per deliquium of these
there sublimed 36grains in a dry white form
like e339 not fusible & 8 or 9grains remained fixed

277
below. The sublimate tasted like common
salt with some acrimony of e339. Of this sublimate
12grains Lead ore 36grains sublimed together the
e339 or e32d (I know not whether) sublimed alone
lying first upon the surface of the Lead ore &
then flying up by degrees & the Lead ore
melted by the help of the dry e017 which it
retained & there remained below 35 1/2grains
The sublimate dissolved almost totally in
e304 except some e30d of 2641. The 35 1/2grains
below in boyling let go 11 1/2grains of salt
like that extracted with e326. Had the sublimed salt
been all of it good e32d it would have
let go 20 or 21 grains & therefore the 12grains
of sublimate conteined 6 or 7grains of good
e32d & 5 or 6grains of either e339 or bad e32d or
thereabouts. In the menstruum which in the beginning
dissolved the 2641 there was about 480grains of water
so that the e00de304e3392641, extracted salt,
sublimate & fex were in proportion to one another
as 80, 160, 40, 60, 15, 12, 3. or as 27, 53, 13, 20,
5, 4, 1. In this & the following experiments I used double e00d such
as would presently work upon crude 2641 with
violence.
This e00d 240grains, vulgar e339 120grains, rain water
480grains mixed together did readily dissolve
crude 2641 put in by degrees & was satiated with
180grains or at most with 210grains. First put in
180grains & when it hath stood 2 or 3 hours
in boyling water put in 30grains & if it work
upon that let it stand in boyling water an
hour or two longer. The whole dissolution
278
was done in 4 or 5 hours. When the liquor
was satiated so that it would not work any
more upon crude 2641, I put a little fresh
water to it to precipitate all its 263fius
vitae which it easily let go totaly or rather
had let it all go before in the boiling.
Then I philtred evaporated & distilled &
after the subacid flegm was come over
there arose a dry white salt in flowers
not fusible tasting like common salt
without any considerable acrimony like that of e339 &
weighing 35grains besides a grain or two which was
washed away by the flegm & in the bottom
there remained 7 1/2 grains of feces tasting
saltish & austere Some part thereof being
a fixt salt. So then the e304e00de3392641,
extracted salt, volatile salt & fex were as
64, 32, 16, 24, 6, 5, 1. This volatile salt
was that by which the salt of Lead ore was
extracted in the foregoing experiment.
e304 480grainse00d 240grainse339 120grains 2641 180grains
digested in boiling water 3 or 4 hours. Then
added to it e00d 60grains 2641 60grains & boiled again
& the salt philtred left 2641 274grains. So that
the 2641 was increased 34grains in weight.
Item e304 480grains e00d 360grains e339 120grains 2641 260
grains boiled together 3 or 4 hours & the Salt
philtred left 2641 280grains so that the 2641 was
increased 20grains. This increase of weight argues
that it coagulated part of the dissolving
spirits.
The philtred salts being evaporated were at

279
last fat & clammy & being put into retorts
& the glasses washt two or three times & the
washings poured into the retorts & distilled there
came over first insipid flegm then a little
acid spirit of e306: then the salts sublimed without
any fluid spirit of 2641. The salt of the first
sublimed in a dry form like e339 & weighed 18grains
& the feces 6grains. This salt was a little
fusible & but a little. The salt of the second
sublimed in a crystalline form without any
dry flowers. First there ascended a little
salt mixt with flegm which stood in the
neck of the retort like fluid dew, but
after a while dried. Then sublimed a
heavy fusible white salt something more
fusible then e326 which stood fluid in the
neck of the Retort till the glass was taken
of the fire & then soon congealed. This
cristalline fusible sublimed salt weighed 22 1/2
grains. & the feces which remained below weighd
7grains. So then in this last Experiment the e304e00d,
2641e339, volatil salt & feces were as 480,
360, 240, 120, 22 1/2, 7 or as 64, 48, 32,
16, 3, 1. This last fusible salt ran totaly
per deliquium into a very clear liquor
without any feces & easily dried again &
in drying became white. Of this salt 3grains
sublimed from Lead ore 12grains, the ore was
not thereby increased in weight nor made
fusible, no not upon a red hot iron, nor
let go any salt in boiling water. Of the

same fusible salt 4grains sublimed over a
candle from the calx of the sublimed Net 3grains
rose heavily & in the bottom after the
first sublimation remained about 5grains which
being ground & sublimed again came to 4grains
& after another sublimation to between
4 & 3grains & then tasted stiptic &
vitriolique Whence this salt is not to be used
for volatizing metals nor ought to be
mixed with e326. Whence also the
mixture of this salt with the e326 made it less
potent for volatising, as I found in some
former experiments. Whence therefore crude
2641 is not to be used for destroying the e339
in e326

e00d 160grainse339 40grains, dissolved Tin 90 or 100grains totally
or almost totally over a candle. The Solution
& fex together being put into a Retort &
distilled there came over (after much insipid
flegm & some acid spirit) about 6grains of a
white volatile salt like flowers into the neck
of the retort, & 93grains remained below, it
was urged an hour or two in a greater heat
then would suffice to raise salarmoniac & in
that heat sublimed continually & by
continuing the heat more would have sublimed. This
sublimate was totally dissolvable in water
& tasted stiptick with a gust of common salt
it seemed to be almost totaly a volatile
salt of Tin, the e339 in dissolving
the Tin being totaly or almost totaly destroyed.

281
e327 freed from the 2641 41grainse00d 60grains, water
twice or thrice as much, Tin 90grains. The menstruum
dissolved about 40grains of the Tin. The solution
being ended I distilled away the liquor & when
the matter was almost dry, it fell a working
with a sudden violent fermentation (upon heating
the glass) & sent up at the same time a
copious white fume: which fermentation increased
for some time after the glass was taken
from the fire & made the neck of the glass
much hotter then before so that it could
not be handled. This fermentation being
over there sublimed into the neck of the
Retort about 20grains of salt in dry flowers not
fusible but totaly dissolvable in water as in
the former experiment. It tasted stiptic like the
former volatile salt of Tin & doubtles
conteined much salt of tin in it whereby it
became dry & not fluxible
In e325 freed from 2641 55grainse00d 70grains & twice
or thrice as much water, I dissolved by degrees
about 28grains or 30grains of Regulus of Tin, letting it
stand by the fire till it was dry. It dissolved
readily in a heat a little greater then that
of blood. Then I precipitated the Regulus with
water poured on, adding more & more water
to cause all or almost all the Regulus to precipitate. For
the more water I poured on the more Regulus
precipitated. Then philtring & evaporating I
put it before twas dry into a Retort (in
doing which I lost above half of it, & in
destilling there ascended about 5 or 6grains of our
e339 volatile enough but without flowing by the heat

either in the neck or breech of the retort &
in the bottom remained a more fixed salt
weighing 3grains: which in 24 hours grew moist
& the said e339 or sublimed flowers in the
same time grew more moist & wet &
in part ran per deliquium into clear
water. So that the salt extracted this
way is carried up by the Regulus some part
of which it carries up & by the rest is
detained below. This way therefore the
Experiment succeeds not: nor any way with Tin

In e327 freed from 2641 41grainse00d 60grains, water
twice or thrice as much I dissolved Tinglass
& there sublimed a very fusible salt of a
yellow colour like brimstone which
weighed about 20grains & ran quickly per
deliquium into a liquor of a clear
white colour but not without a considerable
quantity of white feces which would not dissolve
in water.
2641 2 ounces 2646 1 ounce gave a little
Regulus scarce distinguishable nor separable
from the scoria. All this poudered with indian
Peter 1 ounce & good white Tartar 1 ounce
gave a bright Regulus = 1 1/10 ounce. This Regulus
90 grains put in by degrees to e339 30grains e00d 90grains
& water 90grains dissolved readily but did not
fully satiate the menstruum. And that which
dissolved did not dissolve into a clear salt
but precipitated into a white heavy
pouder, This solution being philtred &
evaporated left almost nothing in the bottom

283
vizt it left about 1/3 of a grain of a more
dark coloured & dirty salt then brown sugar,
about 1/3 or 1/4 or 1/6 of which over a candle
sublimed in a white fume so that all the
30grains of e339 was destroyed except about 1/10
or 1/15 of a grain, that is 1/300 of the whole.
The said Regulus of 2646 60grains put in by
degrees into e339 30grains e00d 90grains & water 90grains
& digested to driness & dissolved & philtred
& dried left 10 or 12grains in the bottom which being
sublimed there remained (to the best of my
memory<)> about 3grains below: so that there remaind about 8grains of e339 undestroyed.
The said Regulus of 2646 90grains put in by
degrees into e327 (freed from the gross 2641 60grains
e00d 90grains & water 90grains did more then suffice
to satiate the menstruum. I believe 60 of Regulus
2646 would have sufficed. This solution
philtred & sublimed gave 18grains of dry white
salt like flowr of e339 & there remained
about 3grains in the bottom. The salt in
the beginning of the sublimation seemed to
ferment a little but, not so much as with
Regulus of 2643


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332
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333
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334
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335
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336
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337
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338
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339
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 and over a candle the matter boyled & fumed
afresh & left in the bottom 4grains or 4 1/6. On
the same little thin glass I put also the matter
(vizt the 4 1/2grains) in the last experiment but one &
it flowed & boyled a little & emitted some
fume. But the fume rose heavily & in the
bottom there remained 4 1/3grains.
 By all these experiments 10 to 15 seems
a very convenient proportion
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343

De sublimatione e316li nostri
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e316 of 2640 10grainse339 12grains on a thin glass over
the flame of a candle boyled pretty much & urged
as much as the flame put close under would do
left 5grains in the bottom, which in the naked flame
of a candle would melt like pitch & on the
same glass held over a fire for a quarter of an hour till it was almost
of a dark red heat & the matter had done
fuming, there remained only 1 2/3grains in the bottom
or at most 2grains.
The same e316 7grainse316 of 2642 3grains & e339 prep. 12grains on the flame
of a candle in the same glass left 6 1/3grains
not fusible nor so volatile as the former
caput mortuum. And e316 of 2642 will in any trial
I have yet made rise above one third of it.
The same e316 10grains e339 prep. 8grains was more
fluxible then before, but after being urged on
the same glass with the strongest heat of a
candle left below 7 1/4grains. And this on the
fire did not flow as the former nor fume
so much. For it left below between 5 & 6
grains.
The same e316 10grains e339 18grains was
fluxible enough & urged on another glass
like the former with the strongest heat of a
candle as before left only 4grains below or 3 5/6.
The same e316 10grains e339 prep 25grains in another glass did not
flow rose heavily & after urging with the greater
heat of a candle left in the bottom 4 1/2grains.
The same e316 10grains e339 prep 15grains in the same
glass left in the bottom 4 1/2grains. But because this
glass was much broader & a little thicker then the
first I put these 4 1/2grains on a thin small glass


De praeparatione e339
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Bought of Mr. Stonetreet 1687
  • Antimony at 4d the 2114
  • Sublimate at 5s 4d the 2114
  • Jallap at 2s 4d the 2114
  • Ol. Vitriol at 3s 0d the 2114
  • Crucibles at 5d the Nest
  • Sal Armoniack at 2s the 2114
  • Double Aqua fortis at 5s 4d the 2114
Mr. Stonetreet is succeeded by Mr. Timothy Langley
Item 1693
  • Quicksilver at 5s the 2114
  • Salarmoniack at 1s 9d the 2114
  • Single Aqua fortis at 2s 8d the 2114
Mr. Stonetreet
Druggist by Bow
Church on the same
side the street
towards Pauls at the
sign of the Queens
head with a rose in
her breast.